Assembling a Find Your Voice Kit from your Stash

Find Your Voice DIY Kit
Find Your Voice DIY Kit

The following is a guest post from Theresa Sondjo on Assembling a Kit from your Stash for the Find Your Voice 2015 Workshop (starting this Wednesday 7/1/2015); you can find Theresa at SubjectVerbObject. I’m a firm believer that scrapbooking needs to be accessible to everyone, and that the goal of scrapbooking is not to purchase and accumulate an endless amount of supplies. Our goal, especially during the Find Your Voice Workshop, is to become the best storytellers we can be, using whatever we have access to and whatever inspires us. 

Find Your Voice DIY Kit
Find Your Voice DIY Kit

When I saw Kristin’s gorgeous Find Your Voice kit, I knew that 1) it wouldn’t suit my purposes (6×9 is not a good size for me) and 2) I could create something similarly striking (oh those colors!) from my stash. After moving internationally last year, I realized that my scrapbooking supplies are just as much a burden as a pleasure, and I am working hard to reduce the consumer footprint that this hobby has on my life. This post outlines the decision making process I go through when assembling a kit from my stash.

I like to scrapbook from kits. I find that one of the most frustrating things about having a large stash is decision paralysis. I have so much stuff that it inhibits my creativity. So before I embark on any sort of large scrapbooking project, I pull supplies and construct a kit to simply the decision making involved in papercrafting. When I don’t have to worry about stuff, I can concentrate on telling stories.

Decision Making – Before I touch my supplies

Size: I know that I want my FYV album to be small and portable. I want to be able to work on it when I have 10 minutes extra minutes at lunch at work, when I’m waiting in the car, or while we’re all down in the basement watching TV in the evening. That means that the size needs to be small, and the pieces need to fit into the plastic containers I already have.

Color: Kristin’s black, white, pink, and gold color scheme is striking, but it won’t work for me. I too love neutral backgrounds, but the pink and reds are too stark against the black and white for me. Instead, I’m using teal with gold accents.

Focus: I’m focusing on writing and photography. I’m a traditional scrapbooker (none of this art journaling stuff for me), which means that I need papers and backgrounds that facilitate writing. Mixed media is lots of fun, but it’s time consuming, and during Find Your Voice, I really want to work on the story-telling aspect of my scrapbooking. That means lots of journaling, lots of stories, lots of photos, and quite a bit less technique and embellishment than I’m used to.

Theme: I am on an arrow and triangle kick, which means I’ll use this theme (similarly to how Kristin used hearts) to choose embellishments that will help pull the kit together.

Other thoughts: I want to USE supplies. I am SO OVER saving pretty paper and alphas and embellishments for the PERFECT project. So when I pick supplies for projects like this, I work hard to focus on my favorites. Favorite paper. Favorite color enamel dots. Favorite gold alphas that I haven’t touched for a year because they are TOO PRETTY. No. That’s ridiculous. I bought them to use them, and use them I will.

Supplies

Find Your Voice DIY Kit - Album and Page Protectors
WRMK Instagram album and page protectors

Album and page protectors: I like WRMK’s Instagram albums for small projects. It’s a perfect size for getting photos developed, instead of printing them myself (I am a lazy scrapbooker). I have lots of pocket scrapbooking supplies already designed for this size, and most importantly, I don’t need to buy and album OR any page protectors.

Find Your Voice DIY Kit - 12x12 and 6x6 paper
12×12 and 6×6 paper

Paper: I pulled several pieces of black and white patterned paper from my stash. Actually, this is all of the black and white patterned paper I have. I am pretty finicky about white vs. cream vs. eggshell, and I was sure to pull only pages that were strictly white. Black and white, then some teal and gold for accents. I chose about a dozen 12×12 pages, in addition to two 6×6 pads: Amy Tangerine’s Stitched, and Authetique Netural.

Find Your Voice DIY Kit
Find Your Voice DIY Kit

Alphas: I actually pulled over a dozen alphas before settling on my final supplies. A few big bold letters (thickers and other), and a few small alphas.

Embellishments: Kelly Purkey has some great plain white labels that I like for stamping on, plus enamel dots, and lots of wood veneer (which I will color appropriately with teal, gold, black, and white ink as needed). I also pulled some washi.

Find Your Voice DIY Kit - Stamps and Ink
Stamps and Ink

Ink: I like Prima Chalk inks for coloring wood grain, Staz On for stamping white on anything at all, Tsukineko Brilliance for metallics, and Versafine Onyx for black inking (all black inking, ever).

Stamps: I’m actually using several of Kristin’s stamps for this project. I’m SO EXCITED that her block number set is now available in acrylic. I can’t justify the money for the wooden stamps, but I snatched up her numbers and alphabets the day they appeared in her shop. I’m also using the official Find Your Voice stamp, as well as the Currently stamp that’s been bumming around my craft room for several months now (I get a lot of use out of that one).

Find Your Voice DIY Kit
Find Your Voice DIY Kit

The finished kit is rough similar in size and inspiration to Kristin’s, but … it cost me zero dollars, uses up a fair number of supplies, and most importantly, suits my memory keeping style.

[hr gap=”5″]

Theresa Sondjo is a writer, a cook, a mother, a runner, a logistician, and a lover of books and coffee. By day, she’s a government bureaucrat, by night, an adventurer. Follow her at SubjectVerbObject as she drags her family around the world in search of adventure, and hopefully leaves the world a better place than she found it.

  • Jenn McClure

    I like how she created her own kit to kind of mirror your kit! She shared some wonderful tips that I plan to use in future projects. This is fantastic!

  • This is amazing. I am pulling from my stash to and will be working with a smaller format as well. I am going for 6×6 mini album (or could be put into the 4-6×6 pages for project life). I am including several white pages for my album too because I want the storytelling (and maybe photos) to the center of my project. I haven’t pulled to much since I’m not completely sure what feel I want this album to have.

    However I totally dig the arrow and triangle feel. I might lift that idea.

    • Thank you, and please do! I can’t wait to see what you do with the 6×4 size. I really like smaller albums for this kind of project.

  • Rosanna Diggs

    I love your decision making process! Stop hoarding and start using should be a banner in my craft space. :) Also, totally love seeing the Currently stamp in the mix. My all time favorite stamp set! Also, where did you get your StazOn Cotton White? I’ve been trying to find white stazon for photo stamping for months!

  • Kelley Fewer

    I, too, shopped my stash! (I made a decision this year that I couldn’t buy anything new unless I used something in stash…one thing in=one thing out/used) I enjoyed the process of putting together a kit to use on the road; it was challenging to limit myself!

  • Cindy Borcherding

    I LOVE the color choices of your kit!! May I ask the way your print the 4×4 photos? I want to use a smaller album like this but don’t know the best app and/or service for this size. Thank you!!

    • I use PicStich (for my phone) and PicFrame (for my mac) to just dump them onto a 6×4 frame, then use the 1 hour photo at my local mall. I end up with nice borders and plenty of whitespace without having to pay for special 4×4 printing.

      • Cindy Borcherding

        So you DO add a border to the 4×6 photo then correct? :) Sorry to be a pain!!

        • Sometimes! Not always, but with PicStich it’s easy to do.